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Poetic Elements Vocab List
Due Date: 10/26/2018
Subject: English 10

Imagery 

  • Images are any items that we can respond to with the five senses: sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell. 

  • Poetry is a genre of senses.

  • Images are used to create similes, metaphors, and symbols.

Density

  • Prose is loose and wordy compared with poetry

  • Poetry makes use of the connotations (meaning in context) of words, not just their denotations (definitions).

  • This means that the words imply more than the surface meaning.

  • Similes and metaphors also make poems dense.

Rhyme

  • correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words, especially when these are used at the ends of lines of poetry.

Line

  • A line in poetry is a group of words on a line. A line does NOT have to be a complete sentence, but a line will always start with a capital letter.

End Rhyme

  • When the words at the ends of lines in a poem rhyme, it is called end rhyme. Lines with end rhymes often follow each other, but they don't have to.

Stanza 

  • A group of lines in a poem - like a poetic paragraph.

Rhyme Scheme

  • Rhyme scheme is the pattern of end rhymes in a poem. To describe rhyme scheme, letters are used to represent each end rhyme sound in a poem. 

Rhythm

  • Rhythm is the pattern of beats, or stresses, in spoken or written language. Traditional poetry often follows a regular rhythmical pattern.

Meter

  • Meter is a poems rhythmical pattern. This pattern is determined by the number and types of stresses, or beats, in each line. Syllables are each vowel sound and help count the meter.

Scansion

  • Scansion is the process of analyzing a poem's metrical pattern. When a poem is scanned, its stressed and unstressed syllables are marked.

Poetic Feet

  • Stressed and unstressed syllables in a poem are divided into feet by a vertical line when doing scansion. An Iamb is a foot with one unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable.

Iambic Pentameter

  • Iambic pentameter is a line of poetry with five iambic feet, each foot containing one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed

Puritan Plain Style

  • Poetry has many different styles. One popular in America in the 17th century (1600's) was Puritan Plane Style, which is characterized by short words, direct statements, and references to everyday objects and experiences. 

    Anne Bradstreet was one of the first American poets to be published. Her style may seem outdated because she used "thee" instead of "you," "thy" instead of "your," and her syntax (or sentence structure) seems odd. 



Vocab List
Due Date: 9/5/2018
Subject: English 10

Vocab list for Vocab Quiz 1 

  1. Thesis – The author’s claim or main point. The most important sentence in the essay. It is located at the end of the introduction paragraph. 

  1. Topic sentence - Also known as “State it” in the SIEL acronym. It gives a supporting reason, or sub-point, to the thesis. Each body paragraph begins with topic sentence. 

  1. Illustration - This is evidence in the body paragraph that supports the topic sentence. In an argumentative paper, evidence can be statistics, facts, or quotes.  

  1. Imagery – writing that appeals to the five senses: taste, touch, smell, sight, and sound. 

  1. Theme – What the author says about the topic. 

  1. Noun – a person, place, thing, or idea. 

  1. Verb –  an action, occurrence, or state of being. 

  1. Adverb – describes a verb, adjective, or another adverb. 

  1. Adjective – describes a noun. 

  1. Pronoun – takes the place of a noun. 

  1. Anecdote – a very short personal story. 

  1. Hook – An interesting sentence designed to catch the reader’s attention. It is the first sentence in an introductory paragraph. 

Vocab List for Vocab Quiz 2 (9/5/18) 

  1. Narrative – another word for story. 

  1. Abolitionist – someone who wants to abolish slavery. 

  1. Ransom – the price paid to buy someone out of bondage. 

  1. Critics – people who are being critical. 

  1. 1865 – the year the Civil War ended and Lincoln was assassinated. 

  1. Sarcasm – ironic humor. Saying the opposite of what you mean as a joke. 

  1. Bust – a statue of someone's head and shoulders. 

  1. Impertinent – disrespectful; insolent 

  1. Deference – yielding in wishes 

  1. Conjecture – a speculation or guess. 

  1. Sloop – a small ship for traveling up and down the river. 

  1. Privation – lack of the necessities of life. 



Essay Notes
Due Date: 8/20/2018
Subject: English 10

Essay

The introduction paragraph is in three parts: 1. Hook 2. Introduction to topic 3. Thesis

 

Part 1. Hook sentence. The first sentence in the whole paper. It needs to grab the reader’s attention. It can be:
- an interesting quote,

- anecdote,
- statistic,
- or question.
It should be related to your subject. 

Examples of hook sentences:

Quote:

"Do you smell that? That smell - It's the smell of a smelly smell that smells smelly." Stated Mr. Krabs from the show Spongebob Squarepants.

 

Anecdote:

I've always been good friends with my brother. We share lots of jokes, most of which have a Spongebob Square pants tie-in. I think that started when we stayed up all night watching a Spongebob Squarepants marathon. 

 

Statistic:

90% of Spongebob Squarepants viewers have an above average IQ level (Insititute of Spongebob Studies, 143).

 

Question:

Where in the pacific Ocean can you find a delicious Krabby Patty to eat, live in a pineapple, and drive in an underwater boat? Bikini Bottom, of course!

 

Part 2. Introduce topic. The next couple sentences of your introduction paragraph will introduce the reader to your general topic.

Introductory paragraph outline

 

1. Hook sentence – say something interesting about your topic to get your reader's attention.

 

2. Introduce the topic - Tell the reader why your topic is important and why it is worth reading about.

 

3. Thesis statement - state your claim (give your opinion about your topic)

 

Introduce your topic example:
Imagine sitting in class taking the final exit exam for high school. There is a lot at stake. Colleges take the results of the test very seriously. Then someone's cell phone starts going off. Then the student sitting next to you starts texting. This situation is all too familiar in today's high schools. Students using cell phones have become a great distraction in classrooms, causing tension for both teachers and students. Therefore, cell phones should be banned from the classroom.

 

3. Thesis statement. The most important sentence of your essay. It needs to include your opinion (claim) about your topic (subject)

 

Good vs. Bad thesis statements:
A. A good thesis statement is short and simple: it should not be longer than one sentence.
- Good example: Success is a result of doing the right things consistently.

- Bad example: In a world like today's in which many people are aiming at improving their lives and doing the right thing it is important to delineate the one trait that ultimately determines success: doing the right things consistently.

 

B. A good thesis statement sticks to one main point.

- Good example: The key to specific dieting is focusing on a specific goal.

- Bad example: The key to specific dieting is focusing on a specific goal, which is also the key to successfully running a business and coaching a football team.

 

C. A good thesis statement is a declarative sentence with no qualifiers (might, maybe, perhaps, etc.)

- Good example: Lebron James' ability to score, pass, and rebound make him the league's most valuable player.

- Bad example: Does  Lebron James' ability to score, pass, and rebound make him the league's most valuable player?

- Bad example:  It may be that Lebron James' ability to score, pass, and rebound make him the league's most valuable player.

 

Body Paragraphs are in four parts:

1. Statement - Topic Sentence

2. Illustration - use evidence (statistics, facts, and quotes) to back up your topic sentence.

3. Explanation -  explain how your illustration (evidence) supports your  statement (topic sentence)

4. Link (transition sentence)

 

1. Statement (topic sentence)

In an argumentative paper, this is a reason that supports your claim (thesis).

Example:

Students should be allowed to use cell phones in school because they help students communicate with their parents about after school activities. In his article, "Why Students Need Cell Phones," George Daily gives the example of a student named Rita who plays basketball after school. Her mom likes her having a cell phone because she sometimes gets a ride with her friend and having a cell phone is helpful for communication. There are a lot of students, like Rita, who are good students and will use their cell phones responsibly to talk to their parents. Having cell phones could also be important to contact their parents during an emergency.

 

2. Illustration (evidence: facts, stats, and quotes)

An illustration provides support to the topic sentence (statement). The illustration should be two to three sentences long.

Example:​ Students should be allowed to use cell phones in school because they help students communicate with their parents about after school activities. In his article, "Why Students Need Cell Phones," George Daily gives the example of a student named Rita who plays basketball after school. Her mom likes her having a cell phone because she sometimes gets a ride with her friend and having a cell phone is helpful for communication. There are a lot of students, like Rita, who are good students and will use their cell phones responsibly to talk to their parents. Having cell phones could also be important to contact their parents during an emergency.​

 

3. Explanation

The explanation makes sure your reader knows why you used the illustration. It shows exactly how your illustration backs up your statement and explains any confusion about your illustration. It is usually one to two sentences long but sometimes it can be longer.

Example:​

Students should be allowed to use cell phones in school because they help students communicate with their parents about after school activities. In his article, "Why Students Need Cell Phones," George Daily gives the example of a student named Rita who plays basketball after school. Her mom likes her having a cell phone because she sometimes gets a ride with her friend and having a cell phone is helpful for communication. There are a lot of students, like Rita, who are good students and will use their cell phones responsibly to talk to their parents. Students can also use cell phones to contact their parents during an emergency.

 

4. Link (transition sentence)

The link is the sentence that sets up the next paragraph. It helps your reader follow along with your argument.

Example:​

        Students should be allowed to use cell phones in school because they help students communicate with their parents about after school activities. In his article, "Why Students Need Cell Phones," George Daily gives the example of a student named Rita who plays basketball after school. Her mom likes her having a cell phone because she sometimes gets a ride with her friend and having a cell phone is helpful for communication. There are a lot of students, like Rita, who are good students and will use their cell phones responsibly to talk to their parents. Students can also use cell phones to contact their parents during an emergency.​ If there is an emergency at school, students will need their cell phones to contact their parents. Blah blah blah, next paragraph stuff, blah blah blah blah.



Conclusion

The conclusion has three parts:

1. Return to hook 

2. Restate your thesis (main point) and sub points

3. Call to action

1. The Hook

o                If you asked a question in your hook, answer it.

o                If you gave a shocking statistic, give another that supports your point.

o                If you told an anecdote, reflect on how it impacted you in relation to your thesis.

o                If you used a quote, give another quote about the same topic. 

2. Restate your thesis and main points

Reword your thesis statement

Restate your sub-points a concisely as possible.

3. Call to action

Tell your reader what they should do or think differently because of reading your essay.

 

 

 

 



Classroom Procedures
Due Date: 8/10/2018
Subject: English 10

Classroom Procedures

1. Tardy sign in – If you are not in your seat when the bell rings, you are tardy and must sign the tardy sign in sheet. 

      Two tardies = break detention

      Three tardies = parent contact

      Four tardies = office referral

2. Hall Passes – You will be given three hall passes every nine weeks. 

These are to be used to:

      Go to the bathroom

      Get a drink of water

      Or visit a counselor or administrator

Hall passes are not for:

      Visiting friends

      Turning in work for other classes or visiting other classes

      Being gone longer than five minutes from class

      Using the vending machines

      Visiting the nurse (a nurse's pass will be given for that purpose)

If you keep all three passes you can turn them in for extra credit that will boost your lowest quiz grade up by 25%

If you keep one or two passes they can boost a daily grade up by 25% each

If I send you on an errand you will not need to use a hall pass.

3. Cell phones – All electronic devices must be turned off and should not be visible.

·          The first time I see your cell phone (or headphones) I will ask you to put it away.

·       The second time I see it out I will ask you to hand it to me and I will give it back at the end of class, if you are polite.

·       The third time I see it out I will ask for it and will turn it in to Ms. Baley in the front office. 

4. Food and drinks – Are not permitted in Mr. Donahue's class. 

Do not bring food into class

Do not bring drinks into class

A water bottle with a closable lid is permitted as long as it is kept on the floor next to your desk.

5. Turning in Assignments – All work must be turned in on the date it is assigned.

Failure to turn in work on time will result in a deduction every school day it is late (even if you don't have my class on that school day).

You are responsible to put all late work in the folder marked "LATE WORK."

Classwork/Homework will either be passed forward to Mr. Donahue or you will be responsible to put it in the proper folder on his desk.

6. Missing Class – Be here as much as possible

You will not be allowed to make up work for unexcused absences. 

If you have an excused absence you have three school days to make up the work. (We will work out an individualized plan for extended-excused absences).

All assignments and handouts will be kept in the filer in the front of the room. It is your responsibility to get those assignments.

7. Remind101 – Sign up!

General English 10 Text the message @donahuephs to the number 81010. If you’re having trouble with 81010, try texting @donahuephs to (334) 219-4432. If you have a smartphone, get push notifications. On your iPhone or Android phone, open your web browser and go to the following link: rmd.at/donahuephs

Honors English 10 Text the message @mrdonahue1 to the number 81010. If you’re having trouble with 81010, try texting @mrdonahue1 to (334) 219-4432. If you have a smartphone, get push notifications. On your iPhone or Android phone, open your web browser and go to the following link: rmd.at/mrdonahue1

ESL Text the message @mrdonahue2 to the number 81010. If you’re having trouble with 81010, try texting @mrdonahue2 to (334) 219-4432. Or visit remind.com/join/mrdonahue2

You will receive a confirmation text saying that costs may encure. All this means is that depending on your cellphone plan, you may be charged for the texts. If you have unlimitted texting you will NOT be charged.

Remind101 is for:

·         Reminding you when work is due

·         Reminding you about events related to class or school

Remind is not for:

·         Assigning work (Saying that you didn't get a remind about an essay, test, or any other assignment is not an excuse for turning it in late. Anything sent on Remind has already been communicated in class).

·         Checking during class time (see cell phone policy).

The sign-up sheets for remind are posted by the door and are available on my page at gophslions.com

Your parents have already been added to remind. You don't want them knowing more than you do about what is going on in class!

8. Your first grades – due on Friday 8/10/18

What is due:

One classroom supply item. A reem of copy paper, hand sanitizer, roll of paper towel, tissue box, Expo markers, or Cleaning wipes.

A composition notebook for journaling.

Quiz on Friday covering your personal interests, classroom policy, and nouns.

9. Grades – How to get an A – turn in all your assignments on time and study for assessments!

Daily Grades – worth 5% of your total grade. These are participation grades.

 

Minor Grades – worth 35% of your total grade. These are for classwork, homework, and quizzes.

 

Major Grades – worth 60% of your total grade. These are for tests, essays, and journals.